The Institute

Tag: New York

ATTENTION, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, YOUR ATTENTION, PLEASE: “THE U.S. IS NO PLACE FOR A WAR CRIMINAL”

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“THIS IS THE DAY I DREAD EVERY DAY I’M ON THE JOB”

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Don’t get me wrong, I think young people are swell, and have all kinds of interesting ideas and opinions on things that we should pretend to give a damn about. But, if, as I suspect, CBS.com has handed over the episode summary writing to some wet behind the ears, zit cream applying teenybopper heads are in need of rolling. I mean it. It’s unacceptable, and I know they know it. Enough said.

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“Frank goes on high alert when a threat to New York City may be imminent following a terrorist attack in the Middle East”

-CBS.com ‘Blue Bloods’ season6, episode 1 summary

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Later, while in a meeting with Assistant District Attorney for Manhattan (who is also his daughter), Erin Reagan the following conversation regarding a suspected terrorist hideout takes place:

Commissioner Reagan: I think it’s better to ask forgiveness than permission on this one.

Assistant District Attorney Erin Reagan: Dad, you are moving on one man’s uncorroborated story. What if you raid that apartment, kill three Muslims, and don’t find a single bomb on site? That’s a lot of backfire that you’re standing in front of.

Commissioner Reagan: When I consider the alternative, I’ll take that risk.

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ARTISTIC INTERPRETATIONS OF CHARACTERS AND SCENES FROM THE GREATEST TELEVISION SHOW THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN

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My work, utilizing the CBS police procedural drama series, ‘Blue Bloods’ ( Starring Tom Selleck as Frank Reagan, the New York Police Commissioner, and patriarch of the Reagan clan, a multigenerational family of cops) explores the relationship between postmodern discourse and law enforcement.

With influences as diverse as Munch and Andy Warhol, new insights are crafted from both explicit and implicit textures.

Ever since I spent most of the 1980s watching ‘Hill Street Blues’ I have been fascinated by the essential unreality of the human condition. What starts out as triumph soon becomes manipulated into a dialectic of lust, leaving only a sense of failing and the chance of a new reality.

As intermittent derivatives become clarified through frantic and diverse practice, the viewer is left with a clue to the darkness of our future.

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Fixing his tie in the reflection of the glass covering a photograph of Teddy Roosevelt, Commissioner Frank Reagan contemplates what is to come while his trusted advisor and Deputy Commissioner of Public Information, Garrett Moore stands at the ready

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Commissioner Frank Reagan makes one last face before he heads out to give a speech to a mob of braying college students drunk on their fanatical belief in a utopia yet to come.

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THE SCENE IN ‘ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK’ WHEREIN THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES (PLAYED WONDERFULLY BY THE LATE ACTOR, DONALD PLEASANCE), JUST HAVING BEEN RESCUED BY SNAKE PLISSKEN, IS SHAVED (AND GENERALLY MADE READY) FOR APPEARING ON TELEVISION REGARDING A MATTER OF GREAT IMPORTANCE

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SCRIPT FROM THE SCENE, PREVIOUS TO THE ONE PICTURED BELOW, IN WHICH THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TAKES HIS REVENGE UPON THE DUKE OF NEW YORK

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President: [fires machine gun at the Duke] Ayy! Number Onnee! You’re the Duke! You’re the Duke!

[stops firing]

President: You’re the… Duke.

[quietly]

President: You’re… A-number one.

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